Egg Heads: A Planting Craft

The original idea for this craft came from the Our Best Bites Savoring the Seasons cookbook. If you want to see a super cute example of these little planters, then you should check out the book.

I’ve mentioned before that this is not, and never will be, a food blog. Even though I’ve posted recipes before, it’s not something I do consistently or probably even very well, for that matter. I should take the time now to also point out that this is not, and never will be, a craft blog. Crafting is just not something that really comes naturally to me.

Even so, here I am, posting a little planting craft. I almost didn’t. They didn’t turn out quite like I envisioned; a little more “rustic” and a lot less cute. But then I figured, hey, maybe someone out there is looking for something new to do with their quarantine time and their egg shells.

I know eggs can sometimes be a little harder to come by these days, but if you’ve got some and you’re using them anyway, take a little extra time to just remove the top third of the shell. You can do this by either being an expert egg cracker, or you can use a sharp knife to get it started. I found that making a sort of drilling motion with the knife point worked best for me.

I have to admit, though, that the drilling a hole into an egg shell brought back some memories of my most embarrassing mortifying experience of elementary school. I’m sure they didn’t let us use knives to make the holes in our eggs, but my memory of that part is a little fuzzy. What I do know is that we, the fourth graders, were congregated in the grassy area near the playground and were each given an egg with which we were going to make a blown-Easter egg craft. We made two small holes in the egg – one on either pole – and were told to blow the contents out into a cup and then dispose of the contents in  the restrooms. Well, I successfully blew my egg-insides into a cup and was heading to ask permission to take it to the restroom to flush away, when I tripped. Now, I adored my fourth grade teacher and would have been terribly embarrassed had the egg splashed on her. But it didn’t. Instead, it went all over the front of Mrs. Fjelsted’s skirt. Mrs. Fjelsted, the scary teacher. I wanted to die of both shame and fear. Or be swallowed by the earth. Anything but face what I thought for sure would be her wrath. I’m not sure what I thought she’d do to me – eat me maybe? – but I just knew it would be terrible. In the end, I survived. I don’t think I even got in trouble; the fact that I had drawn unwanted attention toward myself was enough.

Luckily for you, you can do this egg craft without the supervision of any scary fourth grade teachers. Unless you are one yourself. Or invite one over; but under the current pandemic situation, I don’t think that’s advised.

Ok, back to your eggs. After you’ve removed the top bit of shell, wash out the inside to remove any remaining egg bits. Then, fill it most of the way to the top with potting mix, sprinkle some seeds (we did grass, cilantro, and basil) on top of that, and then add just a bit more potting mix to cover the seeds. Give it a drink, put it in a sunny spot, and watch it grow! Couldn’t be easier. A word to the wise, though: don’t use grass seed that is 10+ years old. The germination rate goes down real quick after a couple years, which is why our egg heads are so sparsely tufted.

There you have it – an eggcelent (sorry, not sorry) pandemic quarantine life (or anytime) craft.

2 Comments

  1. Love this idea! We will have to give it a try! And your recollection of the egg spill was hilariously written! Brought back lots of memories for me and I wasn’t even there! Haha.

  2. Ha, Heather! The things that are remembered from elementary school😊. I’m glad you posted. I think the eggs are very cute! Nicely done!

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