Garden Tour: Cache Soil to Table

This past weekend I went on a Garden Tour hosted by the Cache Soil to Table group in conjunction with the Bridgerland Audubon Society. The Cache Soil to Table community is a group of garden enthusiasts, that among other interests is also dedicated to creating beautiful, edible, drought tolerant and pollinator friendly landscapes. For the tour, six gardens were showcased that exemplified one or more of these characteristics. At each of the gardens, the homeowners and other volunteers were on hand to answer any questions.

It was a hot Saturday, but conveniently all six houses were located along the same shady street. With sunhats on, my trusty little buddy (read: 10 month old daughter) and I took a stroll down the street and admired the creativity with which the gardens have been designed and created. Though the bright sunshine wasn’t the most conducive for photo-taking, I’ll still let the pictures do most of the talking. But, if you’re interested in more details about each of the gardens featured on the tour, check out the Cache Soil to Table blog.

The raised bed vegetable gardens at Garden 1 are also fitted with frames for adding frost cloth to help extend the growing season.

The raised bed vegetable gardens at Garden 1 are also fitted with frames for adding frost cloth to help extend the growing season.

 

At the top of the side yard slope, next to the raised beds, are trellises for growing raspberries and blackberries. The slope down to the backyard has been terraced to provide more garden space.

At the top of the side yard slope, next to the raised beds, are trellises for growing raspberries and blackberries. The slope down to the backyard has been terraced to provide more garden space.

 

Our alkaline soils in Northern Utah aren't conducive to growing blueberries, but planted in a container (in this case, the container is a bag of peat) they are thriving at Garden 1.

Our alkaline soils in Northern Utah aren’t conducive to growing blueberries, but planted in a container (in this case, the container is a bag of peat) they are thriving at Garden 1.

 

Mulch has been used extensively at Garden 1 to help keep the weeds down and conserve water.

Mulch has been used extensively at Garden 1 to help keep the weeds down and conserve water.

 

Edibles aren't simply relegated to the raised bed gardens, but can also be found in the front lawn - protected by wire cages to deter the deer.

Edibles aren’t simply relegated to the raised bed gardens, but can also be found in the front lawn – protected by wire cages to deter the deer.

 

Mulch is also used as a pathway material at Garden 1.

Mulch is also used as a pathway material at Garden 1.

 

edible landscaping

At Garden 3, much of the large grassy center of a circle-driveway has been converted to a flower and vegetable bed.

 

A couple rows of columnar fruit trees form a privacy screen along the street-edge at Garden 3.

A couple rows of columnar fruit trees form a privacy screen along the street-edge at Garden 3.

 

One of the highlights of Garden 5 was this solar pergola - functional for shading and for capturing energy.

One of the highlights of Garden 5 was this solar pergola – functional for shading and for capturing energy.

 

In addition to providing shade and energy, the pergola also serves as a structure for growing grapes.

In addition to providing shade and energy, the pergola also serves as a structure for growing grapes.

 

Between the pergola and the house was a large mixed perennial bed.

Between the Garden 5 pergola and house was a large mixed perennial bed. If you look carefully, you might spot some asparagus tucked in towards the back.

 

At Garden 5, a couple different of yarrows were present in the main ornamental bed. I particularly liked this red one.

At Garden 5, a couple different of yarrows were present in the main ornamental bed. I particularly liked this red one.

 

At Garden 6, instead of a traditional front lawn, there are a number of raised beds, like these pictured here with a trellis for the peas and cucumbers to climb.

At Garden 6, instead of a traditional front lawn, there are a number of raised beds, like these pictured here with a trellis for the peas and cucumbers to climb.

 

Garden 6 also had edibles, like these potatoes, mixed in with woody and herbaceous perennials in the berm at the front of the lot.

Garden 6 also had edibles, like these potatoes, mixed in with woody and herbaceous perennials in the berm at the front of the lot.

 

Any suggestions on which gardens I should visit next?

2 Comments

  1. Cool gardens! I liked the blueberries growing in the peat moss. I didn’t realize you could do that

    • Heather

      July 1, 2017 at 8:40 pm

      I didn’t realize you could do it either! But I also wonder how long they can last that way – or maybe they’ll have to transplant them into a bigger bag? I should have asked them more questions that.

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