My Summer of Growing Both a Garden and a Baby

During these last few weeks of waiting for my baby to arrive I’ve been thinking about how things (babies, in particular) grow. I really think it’s quite a miraculous process. And maybe we can blame it on all of the BabyCenter weekly updates comparing my growing baby to a random piece of produce, but I got thinking about other miraculous growth processes – like my garden, for example – and how they are kind of the same.

Growing a baby and growing a garden. I mean, sure, they are both living things, but at first glance that seems to be the only similarity. One happens on the inside, one on the outside. One you can eat or put in a vase when ready, the other you probably shouldn’t. But as I’ve been doing both this summer – growing a baby and a garden – I’ve realized that there are some things that are true for both.

First, let’s talk about water.

I’ve written specifically about watering your lawn or garden a couple of times this year, and in every house plants post I mention something about watering, and really, I could probably spend more time talking about it (and most likely will at some point). It really is that important for growing healthy plants.

sprinkler, beans, garden, watering

Keeping that garden, and that baby-growing body, properly watered can sometimes be a delicate balance.

Well, it seems that proper hydration is the answer to a lot of pregnancy complaints too. Have a headache? Try drinking more water. Feeling Braxton-Hicks contractions? You’re probably dehydrated, so drink more water. Swelling up? Here’s a glass of water.

The problem with drinking all this water is that, like when you over-water your house plants and it starts to leak out the catch trays, over-watering yourself may also lead to unfortunate leaks. Or at least increasingly frequent trips to the restroom…

A word on nutrition.

Earlier this month I gave an update on my bucket garden and mentioned how much better my tomatoes were doing this year because I had actually fertilized them. I’ve also discussed the nutritional benefits of compost over at the Longbourn Farm blog, and given a brief explanation of what that sometimes-confusing fertilizer label means here. Though plants technically make their own “food” through the wonderful process of photosynthesis, having the proper nutrients available benefits growth and increases yield. Both good things for that garden you are growing.

lettuce, spinach

I mixed in some extra fertilizer to the potting soil when I planted my lettuce and spinach this year, and got some early, healthy crops.

While I don’t make my own food in quite the same way plants do, eating well is important for both me and my growing baby. And it seems to me that my prenatal vitamins are doing the same kind of thing as the fertilizer – supplementing what is already there (through what I eat) to grow a healthy baby.

s'mores, campfire, mountains

So maybe making s’mores isn’t the best nutritional choice, but it’s summer time, so s’mores must be eaten.

Time flies when you’re having fun.

Oh time. Sometimes it seems to fly by and sometimes it drags on and on and on. Especially when you’re waiting for those tomatoes to ripen or that baby to make her appearance. When growing either plants or babies there are general timelines for reaching “ripeness”; but for both they are really just guidelines. Sometimes it takes longer than the 75 days it says on the label before you can pick that juicy tomato. And sometimes babies show up earlier (or later) than that magical 40 week deadline. Gardens and babies both seem to have their own timetables.

flowers, bucket garden, patio garden, pink zinnia

Though all the zinnias were planted at the same time, you can see there were a couple early-birds among the bunch.

Excitement about “milestones” helps that time to pass more swiftly.

From the moment a seed germinates or starts to sprout through the soil I get excited and love to follow its progress. I often come in to the house reporting to my husband things like “ooh, you should see how much the lettuce is growing!” or “my zinnias have buds!” or “the tomatoes are almost ready to eat!” Whether or not he really cares is a mystery because he always responds encouragingly.

He does get more excited about the “milestones” of growing a baby, though. Maybe not exactly about my monthly (and then weekly) doctors visit updates: “the baby’s heart rate was ___” or “my blood pressure was ___”,  but definitely about the big things (which have been the best parts) like actually seeing the progress – the ultrasounds, watching my belly expand, feeling the kicks, etc.

Comparing our growing bellies with my sister-in-law.

Comparing our growing bellies with my sister-in-law.

The ultimate milestone for gardening is picking that perfectly ripe fruit or enjoying that perfectly beautiful blossom.

This sunflower was a welcome volunteer from last year's flower garden.

This sunflower was a welcome volunteer from last year’s flower garden.

By the time you are reading this, I hope we’ve also reached that ultimate milestone of growing a baby: meeting her for the first time.

4 Comments

  1. Congratulations on growing your garden and growing a baby this summer 🙂

  2. I enjoyed this post. I grew a few babies in my day, and your comparisons are quite apt. Time in the garden will only get more precious after your little one arrives. You will have many gardens, but you will only have her as an infant this once, so let the weeds grow if you have to, or take her out there with you!

    • Heather

      September 22, 2016 at 10:19 am

      I’m glad you enjoyed the comparisons Kathy. It’s true what you say about the gardens, so I’ve been enjoying snuggling my little girl as much as possible!

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