Tag: tomatoes

Eating Local All Year Long

Each year in September is Utah Eat Local Week which is meant to highlight all the great local agricultural (and other) products and inspire people to eat locally grown and produced foods. This year, when Eat Local Week rolled around, I had just finished reading Animal, Vegetable, Miracle by Barbara Kingsolver, which chronicles a year where her family tried to eat as local as possible. I don’t know that I’ll ever be quite that ambitious (or have enough land to grow that much food on), but I do like the idea of growing your own food.

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Tomato, tomahto

It’s funny that when I think of summer garden bounty I always think of tomatoes first. It’s funny because here in Northern Utah they don’t really start coming on in force until the end of summer. And that is where we are at now; the very end of summer. Fall officially, or atsronomically, begins on Thursday (meteorologically speaking, it’s been feeling like fall for a week or so now).

But guess what? Tomatoes are still to be found aplenty; slowing down, perhaps, but still around. I can still enjoy a fresh tomato with practically every meal, and hopefully I still have time to bottle some for the upcoming winter months (babies tend to have their own plans, I’m discovering, which aren’t always conducive to preserving fruit).

Whether or not I get to the tomato-bottling project, I did want to record a few notes about the tomatoes I planted in my garden this year. This is probably more for my own benefit than for anyone else, but maybe it will help you in deciding what kind of tomatoes to plant next year in your garden.

This year I planted five different varieties. There were more options available, and I considered buying one of each, but in the end the research technician inside of me came out and said, “do you really want to try and compare that many? Limit the variables!” I listened to that voice, and came away from the greenhouse shop with two cherry tomato varieties and three types of slicing/canning tomatoes. What follows is my very non-scientific review. I promise I’m much more detailed in my other research endeavors.

Since the cherry tomatoes were the first to ripen, let’s talk about them first. I planted them in my bucket garden where I could easily keep track of them, and easily harvest and eat them. Here are my thoughts about the two varieties I planted this year:

  1. Supersweet 100 – the tag indicated they mature in 65 days; according to Instagram, I harvested the first ones around July 27, so without knowing the exact day of when the plant was started, I’d say that timeline is pretty accurate. These tomatoes were pretty uniform in size (maybe about a U.S. nickel-size diameter), and ripened up to a lovely red. Though the name says they will be “supersweet”, I found them to have a pleasant, though definitely prominent, acidic note. I wish I had some quantitative measurements on the  yield I’d probably plant these again, but if other options were available I wouldn’t have a problem trying something new.
    Cherry tomatoes, tomatoes, supersweet 100

    The Supersweet 100 tomatoes are what you typically think of in a cherry tomato: cherry red color, and cherry-sized.

     

  2. Sunsugar – these were said to mature in 75 days; again, according to Instagram, I harvested the first ones around August 2, so my guess is this timeline is also fairly accurate. These tomatoes had a wide range of sizes, from very small to largeish (about a U.S. quarter-size in diameter). I found these to be much sweeter than the “Supersweets”, and much to my pleasant surprise they were a bright orange when fully ripe. My first few were perhaps a little under-ripe, but I learned that they only got sweeter and more orange with time. I will definitely be planting this variety again.

    tomato, cherry tomato, sunsugar

    This bright orange color means they are ripe and ready to eat.

As for the other tomatoes, I planted the following varieties: Early Girl, Better Boy, and Hamson (also known locally as DX-52). I don’t have a lot to say about these because my garden was so neglected this year due to my pregnant self’s lack of motivation to weed. I chose Early Girl so I could have some early slicing tomatoes, but I didn’t harvest my first one until well after my cherry tomatoes were ripe, and I’m pretty sure well after any of my grandpa’s were ripe. Better Boy is supposedly known for producing abundant fruit, but as of this writing, I have picked maybe two tomatoes from it. I planted the Hamsons so I could have some tomatoes to bottle, but again, I have harvested a paltry dozen; enough to eat, but not enough to bother with for canning. I knew it would grow well, since my grandpa swears by it, and this is the only kind he grows. It was bred by a USU Extension Professor to grow well in Utah conditions and be able to hold up well under the canning process. Unfortunately for me, it was not bred well to produce abundantly even while neglected. Here’s hoping I have more motivation and time next year.

 

Heat stressed tomato plants

I’m interrupting the regularly scheduled post on soil pH (I know, I know, you’re all really disappointed) to talk about tomatoes for a minute. Continue reading